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20121129
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is terrible for the market. well, the easiest way to end the uncertainty about the fiscal cliff and tax rates and their potential impact of the vast majority of americans as they go into this vital holiday shopping season that's pretty central to our economy is for us to pass that and say okay, that part of this is over. the $2,000 on average tax hike that most working families are facing, if we go over the cliff done, taken care of. now, let's work through the balance of increased revenue on the high income earners and spending cuts that we need to get done to achieve a roughly $4 trillion savings. >> bill: and closing loopholes and other issues. >> that's a difficult process. there's lots of detail to it. in my view, there's two bad outcomes here that are quite possible. first is we do nothing. which is -- something we seem to have shown some real capability of. but if we go over the if is cal cliff, which is really more of a slope than a cliff. it is not like y2k where january 1, everybody has a dramatic cuts in services an
released his counterproposal on the fiscal cliff that grover norquist is still very much in charge of the republican party. republicans said once again that they were absolutely unwilling to raise tax rates on the wealthiest of americans. even though they were adopted in 2001 as a temporary measure only because we had a surplus. they were temporary because ten years later, we might have a surplus. we might need the money. that's exactly the situation is today. but sadly, it is not grover norquist or mitt romney or mitch mcconnell that's running the republican party. it is still a big lobbyist by the name of grover norquist. have a good one folks!
the road. not that far down the road but get into 2013, get the fiscal cliff thing behind us. why? >> i think tom coburn and the president have slightly different reasons for it. but the problem with just doing tax reform when you don't have the rates going back up is that these deductions and credits that we're going to have to go after to reform, they primarily benefit people at the top. but they also benefit middle-class families. and if you just change those then what you end up doing is raising taxes on middle-class families as well. to get the same amount of revenue. in other words, if you're trying to get a revenue target, let's say $1.6 trillion which is what the president wants. you try to do that just by reforming the code, without the rates. you don't touch the rates. the only way to do it is to get the money out of the middle class. the president doesn't want to do that and most people don't want to do that. but if you let the rates go back up, you're basically halfway to your revenue target and you can
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3